Rembrandt van Rijn etching for sale print The Good Samaritan 1633 3
Rembrandt van Rijn etching for sale print The Good Samaritan 1633
Rembrandt van Rijn etching for sale print The Good Samaritan 1633 2
Rembrandt van Rijn etching for sale print The Good Samaritan 1633 signature
Rembrandt van Rijn etching for sale print The Good Samaritan 1633 3
Rembrandt van Rijn etching for sale print The Good Samaritan 1633
Rembrandt van Rijn etching for sale print The Good Samaritan 1633 2
Rembrandt van Rijn etching for sale print The Good Samaritan 1633 signature
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
(Leiden 1606-1669 Amsterdam)

“The Good Samaritan”, 1633

Etching: 26,2 x 21,3 cm

signed and dated lower centre: ‘Rembrandt. Inventor. Et. Fecit. 1633’

Notes

This etching depicts the final scene in the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25–37) in which the Samaritan stopped to help a traveler who had been attacked by robbers. Here he has brought the wounded man on horseback to an inn and pays for the man’s care and lodging. This is one of two etchings in which Rembrandt reproduced his own paintings. The Good Samaritan repeats with a number of variations the composition of his painting in the Wallace Collection, London. Among Rembrandt’s additions here to the largely empty foreground that appeared in the painting is the defecating dog that adds a note of everyday reality to the biblical scene.

In the Parable of the Good Samaritan, Jesus uses the example of the Jew and the Samaritan, who would not ordinarily have been friendly towards each other. However, out of all those who could have helped the Jew, only the Samaritan did. Jesus tells of a man who was travelling from Jerusalem to Jericho and was attacked by robbers on the way. He was badly beaten and left for dead.

The first person to pass the injured man was a priest, who crossed the road and continued walking.

The second person to pass the injured man was a Levite, a priest’s assistant. He also crossed the road and continued walking without helping the man.

The third person to come by was a Samaritan, a person from Samaria. The Samaritans were hated by the Jews. When the Samaritan saw the man, he took pity on him. He bandaged him and cleaned his wounds. He then put him on the back of his donkey and took him to an innkeeper, whom he paid to look after him.

The parable ends with Jesus giving a commandment to go out and do the same as the Samaritan had done. This teaching of loving one’s enemies is also reflected in Matthew’s Gospel.

Provenance

  • Unidentified circular blindstamp, possibly Lugt 2923b (early to mid-18th century), England or Netherlands (see Stogdon, 2011, p. 375).
  • Alfred Seymour (1824-1888), London and Trent (Lugt 176)
  • his sale, Christie’s, London, 4 April 1878, lot 61 (£ 8.15)
  • Dr Michael Berolzheimer (1866-1942), Fürth, Munich and Untergrainau, Germany, and Mount Vernon, New York (without mark and not in Lugt)
  • Prominent German-American collection; by descent from the above
  • Private collection, The Netherlands.

Literature

Bartsch 90; White/Boon 116;

The New Hollstein Dutch 116 Fourth state (of IV) ;

Nowell-Usticke R+: “A very scarce plate, seldom found in fine condition” ;

Plate not in existence.

Condition

On laid paper, watermark Foolscap with five-pointed Collar (Hinterding E.a, circa 1639-40), a very good impression of the fourth, final state, with small margins, in very good condition

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