Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 3
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 4
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 5
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 6
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 2
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 3
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 4
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 5
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 6
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale 2
Pieter Claesz - still life with roemer, tazza and lemon - Dutch Old Master painting for sale
Pieter Claesz
(Berchem 1597 – 1660/1661 Haarlem)

“Still life with a roemer, silver tazza, a peeled lemon, a watch, meat pie, a loaf of bread and shells on a white table cloth”

Oil on panel: 88 x 64 cm

Dated center left “1640

Notes

Along with Willem Claesz Heda, Pieter Claesz is considered to be the great master of the Dutch ‘Monochrome Banket’ paintings, which were very much sought after in the 1640’s. In contrast to the shine and glitter of golden and silverware and the abundance of foods that we find in the pronk still lifes, these banquets show simple objects and foods, rendered in a predominantly brownish, greyish tone, and ordered in simple and balanced compositions.

Where his paintings of the 1630s were marked by a sober monochrome palette, those of the 1640s displayed a baroque theatricality, influenced by the sumptuous banquet scenes of Jan de Heem’s first Antwerp period. Claesz was especially gifted when it came to capturing the glint of light on metal, as evidenced by the subtle highlights and clever reflections in the gilt cup and silver ewer in this painting; it was in these passages that his painterly bravura was most appreciable. Indeed, at the end of the decade Constantin Huygens included his name in the list of painters who would contribute to the Oranjezaal in Huis ten Bosch Palace, working under Jacob van Campen, where Huygens contracted him to paint the gold and silver objects.

Pieter Claesz must have considered the rendering of materials and light reflections as the main objective, and he mastered this art better than any other painter.

In this present picture we can see several recognizable objects such as the large Roemer Glass, a silver tazza, a silver Venetian like glass in the background, a watch, meat pie, a peeled lemon, loaf of bread, shells, a book and some nuts on a white table cloth. Many of the objects and foods emphasise a symbol of ephemerality and time passing.

Provenance

  • Private collection, Switzerland
  • Douwes Fine Art, Amsterdam

Expertise:

  • This painting is accompanied by a confirmation letter from Dr. Fred Meijer, Amsterdam, 8 August 2022.
  • Furthermore, technical analysis has been done by Redivivus B.V. in The Hague with a report from January 5th 2023 ;
  • including a dendrochronological examination of the wooden panel by Prof. Dr. Peter Klein, Hamburg, resulting in a possible creation between 1635 and 1645.
  • According to Martina Brunner-Bulst, Firenze, March 2023, this work could possibly be in collaboration with the son of Pieter Claesz, and brother of Claesz Pietersz. (later called Nicolaes Pietersz. Berchem). He was mentioned as painter in the studio of Pieter Claesz and Roelof Koets in 1640 in two notarial deeds in the Haarlem Archive. We know from these notarial deeds that a young painter also belonged to the circle of Pieter Claesz and Roelof Koets. It is the 19-year-old ‘painter’ Cornelis Pietersz. He signed, stating his age and profession, “Painter”. On September 29 and October 11, 1640, the two documents were signed together with Roelof Koets (about 48 years old) and Pieter Claesz (about 43 years old), all three as painters. This concerned the amount owed at the inn of Rijck Willemsz for food and drink consumed (cf. Irene van Thiel-Stroman, Pieter Claesz (Biography), in: Painting in Haarlem 1500-1850. The collection of the Frans Hals Museum, Ghent/ Haarlem 2006, pp. 125, note 18).

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